Personal Butternut Squash Soup

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Some days, you just need a personal bowl of soup, amirite? And yes, it is a little labor-intensive just to make one bowl of soup, but maybe that’s what we need today to get our election jitters out?⁠

So by now y’all know that I get a produce box delivered each week, and I absolutely love it, but sometimes things come very much NOT as expected. The other week I ordered some butternut squash, and instead of getting one 1-lb squash like I would have picked up from the store, I got these two teeny tiny squash.

Admittedly, they sat there for a while before I did anything with them because I didn’t want to deal with the whole peeling/skinning process with two squash. And then one day I was inspired to make some soup for lunch, and I thought these would be perfect! No peeling involved since I just sliced them and roasted them before turning into a soup.

Again, is it a little labor intensive for just one serving of soup? Sure. But sometimes that’s just what we need, and man did this cozy, comforting bowl of soup absolutely hit the spot.

Anyhow, if you have a toddler-sized butternut squash and are wondering what the heck to do with it, I got you covered with this easy personal butternut squash soup!

Have you made this? Let me know what you think or any questions you have in the comments below!


RECIPE (Serves 1)

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 small butternut squash⁠
  • 1/4 yellow onion, diced⁠
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil⁠
  • 12oz. broth (can use any kind based on preference)⁠
  • 1 tbsp. oregano⁠
  • 1 tsp. salt⁠
  • 1 tsp. pepper⁠
  • 1 tsp. red pepper flakes (optional)⁠

DIRECTIONS:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Mix 1 tbsp. olive oil with oregano, salt and pepper, and red pepper flakes (if using). Cut your butternut squash in half, scoop out the seeds, and place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or foil. Brush your mixture evenly over both sides of the squash. Roast the squash halves for about 30 minutes, or until fork-tender. Once done, remove from oven and let cool. Once cooled, scoop the squash flesh (aka remove the skin), and place in a medium-sized pot on the stove. In the same pot, add the diced onion and broth, and stir to combine. Heat the mixture over medium-high heat, bringing to a boil. Once boiling, lower the heat and simmer for about 30 minutes, making sure the onion is tender. When ready, blend your soup by transferring to a blender or using an immersion blender. Serve, and take your time to enjoy!


Fall Apple Breakfast Hash

Classic fall flavors in one skillet for an easy, hearty breakfast.

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Who doesn’t love a breakfast hash, especially one that is *basically* fall in your mouth with each bite? Even better, one that is Whole30 and Paleo compliant?⁠

It’s been hard to remember between the state of the world and the all-pumpkin-everything craze that there are actually other flavors associated with Fall. Not that I don’t love me some pumpkin spice, don’t get me wrong, but let’s not burn ourselves out from pumpkin too quick, okay?

When I think Fall, I also think of warm flavors and foods like potatoes and apples. It screams nice cozy breakfast to me, so that’s exactly what I made with this hash.


So get out your apples this weekend and celebrate the other flavors of Fall, folks, and give this one a try this weekend!⁠

One thing to note — it’s really best if you dice your produce SMALL. It totally changes the composition of the plate in the best way! Also, with the bacon, kitchen scissors are your friend. I love using them to “chop” bigger quantities of bacon.

Have you made these? Let me know what you think or any questions you have in the comments below!


RECIPE (Serves 2)

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 apple (go for a sweet red one!)⁠
  • 1 large red potato⁠
  • 1 small white onion⁠
  • 3 pieces bacon⁠
  • 2 tsp thyme⁠
  • Salt and pepper⁠ to taste

DIRECTIONS:

Dice your apple, potato, and onion, and chop your bacon. Heat a pan over medium heat, and add your bacon. ⁠Once your bacon starts to crisp, add your potato, apple, and onion, and cook until everything is soft and onions are translucent. Serve!


Dairy-Free Fall Kabocha Potato Soup

It’s fall, which officially means one thing – it’s squash season!

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The transition from Summer into Fall this year is a little crazy because of all of the smoke in the Bay Area from the California fires. While it LOOKS like it is cloudy and fall-like outside, it is just the smoke and it is really 90+ degrees! I want it to be Fall so bad that I just crank up the air and turn on the fireplace to give me all the fall vibes and just pretend. And this soup is the perfect meal to top off a Fall day, even if it is a wannabe Fall day.

I chose to use Kabocha squash because it is one of my all-time favorites. It is sweet, yet warm, and everyone in the family likes it. While Butternut is oh-so-popular, my husband isn’t a big fan of it because he says it reminds him of the smell of skinning a deer (aka, gross), so I don’t use it often. Bruce is also a huge fan of Kabocha – it was one of his first foods, since he started eating solids in the Fall!

The one bummer about Kabocha is that it IS a little more difficult to dice if you are using a whole squash. The rind is tough to cut through, but once you get through it and get the ‘guts’ scraped out, it’s not too bad to skin, slice, and dice. That being said, if any of you have any hacks for dicing a Kabocha squash, help a sister out and send them my way!

You’ll notice that in addition to the squash, there are also two yellow potatoes in this soup. Now this is because I like my soups creamy and hearty y’all. I wanted the soup to have a creamy texture, but without the actual cream. And with no coconut cream or dairy-free creamer on hand, I decided to throw in a couple potatoes instead and they completely did the trick. The soup still has great texture and taste, seems light, but it fills you up for sure. Who needs creamer when you have potatoes?

While I used coriander and thyme to spice, you can switch these out with your favorite fall spices if you would like to make the soup more savory or sweet. I went savory, but if you want sweeter, you can consider cloves and cinnamon.

So, if you are looking to celebrate the beginning of Fall with a cozy squash soup like me, give this one a try!

A couple things to note – to save your hand from some serious cramping, you can also use pre-cubed kabocha squash if you can find it; I can find it sometimes at Whole Foods! Using frozen kabocha squash isn’t the best idea, as it will add moisture from being frozen that will thin out your soup.

Also, when blending your soup, I 1000% recommend an immersion blender, as it is SO much easier than transferring to a blender. A cheap one works just fine – I have this one and love it.

Have you made this? Let me know what you think or any questions you have in the comments below!


RECIPE (Serves 4)

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 medium kabocha squash, peeled and cubed
  • 2 large yellow potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 1/4 yellow onion, cut into slivers
  • 4 cups vegetable broth
  • 1 tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. coriander
  • 1 tsp. thyme
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. pepper

DIRECTIONS:

Heat a pot over medium-high heat, and add olive oil. Once the oil is heated, add onion slices and saute until the onions are translucent (about 3-5 mins). Add the cubed squash, potatoes, broth, and salt and pepper. Bring the contents of the pot to a boil. Once there, cover, and turn your heat down to low to simmer. Simmer for about 20 minutes, until both the squash and potato cubes are fork-tender. Add your coriander and thyme. Now, you will blend the soup either in batches using a blender, or in the pot using an immersion blender. Blend until smooth. Let cool, and enjoy!